Thursday, December 6, 2007

Returning tug

8 comments:

leftside said...

Check out this interview with Eliades Acosta, current head of the Department of Culture of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba:

Q.: To what do you attribute the so-called "critical indigence" that bogs down the media in Cuba?

A.: To several factors. There's the abuse of institutional practices to limit criticism. We cannot ignore that -- for many reasons and for a long time -- questions became a nuisance. True, the enemy uses our errors and our criticism.

Q.: Also our silence.

A.: Also. It uses all the empty spaces we leave. Criticism can help solve our problems; silences never solve anything. Asked to choose, we opt for criticism. We must abandon the practice of shushing down the problems, which does not help the Revolution but instead protects posts or positions or postures that are harmful to the ethical climate of society.

Institutionally, criticism was not always permitted, understood or encouraged. This creates a reflex attitude on those who are obliged to engage in [criticism] because of their work. Of course, this is not the task of a profession; criticism is a condition that is part of being a human being.

A kind of self-censorship syndrome is created: "I'm looking for trouble if I tackle a scabrous topic." "I'm going to stay in the center, so as not to invite trouble." A very dangerous vacuum is formed and, even though society may grow economically, it will decline in that climate.

Silences are fatal in a society; so are forgetfulness, self-censorship or unbridled censorship -- because censorship exists in all societies that are divided into classes. Wherever there is a State, there is censorship.

nico said...

Hey Phil,
When is the photo from?
and do you know what is that mass of cement without windows at the far bottom right?

Anton said...

oh, perhaps scaffolding debris screens...

leftside said...

Some kind of wall in front of the other building, but when I was there in March 03, it was only half built (deconstructed?) and the plaza in front featured a "No a La Guerra" mural made up of dozens of children's smaller art pieces.

Phil Peters said...

It's just the side of a building. The empty lot in front of it, corner of Prado and Malecon, was cleared some years ago and fenced in, and there were signs announcing that the Chinese were going to build a hotel there. That plan apparently fell apart, the fence came down, and a little park was put on that lot. I haven't heard of any other plans for construction there.

Anonymous said...

are you sure it's not a new political prison for human rights activists and other deviants?

Phil Peters said...

Actually, it's where they keep the weapons of mass destruction.

Lefty, I understand they're going to bring back the kiddie pacifist artwork to throw everyone off the trail.

Agustin Farinas said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHbrof-tQPw

A good video in Havana about the equality that Cubans enjoy under socialism. What, the woman is Cuban? "No sir, I am sorry she cannot stay with you at this Cuban hotel!" Gee, she has the misfortune of being born Cuban while the guy is lucky enough to have been born a Spaniard. Another of the wonderful things I love about socialism. A Spaniard has no problem staying at a hotel, while the Cuban born woman cannot. Long live the Revolution that gave the Cubans all they deserve, including the right to stay in any Cuban hotel. What a farce!