Tuesday, November 17, 2009

"Conditionality is not leverage in this case"

A Herald op-ed calling for repeal of U.S. travel restrictions by Senator Richard Lugar and Congressman Howard Berman, respectively the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yawn...naive and simplistic. Anything else newsworthy happening today Peters? I heard Soupy sales died recently.

chingon

Anonymous said...

pidgen, what are you so afraid of, typical gusano response trying to deflect or deny. let all americans come to cuba, its the democratic thing to do, not that you'd know much about that.

it just scares the hell of those who want to continue to control the message theyve been shoving down our throats for the past 50 years. no matter how repressive the cuban government is, you and your types are far, far worse

how is it naive and simplistic, unless you were talking about yourself.

Anonymous said...

Look who's back, it's Bootlicker, with the same old tired unimaginative, er, bootlicking. Haven't heard from you since you were doing weird things with the UN Resolution on Cuba. You remember, right? The document criticizing the US brought to you by the worlds largest collection of thugs, murderers, rapists, and thieves -- ie, the UN General Assembly. You must be done with it now and smoking a cigarette.

chingon

leftside said...

The document criticizing the US brought to you by the worlds largest collection of thugs, murderers, rapists, and thieves -- ie, the UN General Assembly.

It must be nice to have such "moral clarity." The rest of the world are thugs and murderers and the US (who has actually killed more people than anyone else the last 10 years) is the paragon of righousness, who must never be criticized - even if it is near unanimous.

Anonymous said...

Yes, leftcrank, it can be fruitful to have some measure of moral clarity in our world, as opposed to your left-wing befuddlement.

Don't know where you get your statistics (nor do I really care) or where I stated the US is the paragon of rightousness (but the fact that we have an immigration problem and not an emigration problem leads me to conclude we are doing something right here).

But yes unlike you I do see a difference between our military killing jihadist terrorists (who incidentally have murdered more Muslims than we ever have) and third world thugs, murderers, rapists, and thieves killing their citizens for the basest of reasons (greed, ethnic cleansing, political power, etc.) while pillaging the wealth of their countries. Unlike you, I guess I am a bit cynical about any of them passing moral judgments on this country.

chingon

rmayor88@gwmail.gwu.edu said...

If I were Phil Peters, I'd be concerned that the majority of the people who read and agree with my opinions are those who agree with the Communist system in Cuba.

People who think Cuba's system of government is less problematic than individuals who hold a certain opinion of how to deal with Cuba have a serious issue. Does an ideology, proven time and time again, to fail people by denying them economic opportunity and political freedom not enough for you to take up and demand freedom for your fellow man?

It is an injustice to support the Castro govt., just as denying the holocaust is an injustice.

Anonymous said...

pigden, and the hundreds of thousands of innocents killed in the illegal war against iraq -- how much blood does america have on its hands. or do you think they were all terrorists -- speaking of which, using your logic i guess the cubans can come in and kill bosch and posada et al in miami

you really are living in a different world from reality.

just keep being happy your racist fascists attitudes continues to prohibit americans from freely traveling to cuba. good job gusano

Anonymous said...

rmayor

ever been to cuba? as son of cuban americans who fled cuba, gee i wonder if your opinion isn't a little tainted.

so do you agree with american policies against cuba? and how in your political science expertize does a small country deal with such aggression; -- regardless of political bent -- or are you just one in a long line that doesn't have a clue about history and reality, just asking

have you ever read any Marti?


mitio

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

"the majority of the people who read and agree with my opinions are those who agree with the Communist system in Cuba."

This is the argument the the hardliners always make about people that want a change in policy and it's wrong. The amount of people that "support" the current system are few and far between, but there are A LOT of people that know the current policies DO NOT work and will NEVER work if you understand anything about the mentality of the Cuban government. They will never respond to the stick and carrot approach out of principle.

Will American tourists provide more money to the government? Sure, but it will also provide a lot of money to regular people and give them more economic freedom. It's hard to stand up against the government when you depend on them for your next meal. If you want people to demand change you have to give them the tools and a better Cuban economy will allow that, not a depressed one as the Embargo is trying to create.

Will a better economy increase suppression by the government? No, they already have all the tools of control in place that they need and a struggling economy doesn't prevent them from asserting control, it makes it easier.

Hardliners need to learn that supporting the loosening of restrictions is not equal to supporting communism. It is a STRATEGY that will actually have an effect on the lives of Cubans, but maybe hardliners would rather let the population keep suffering without hope of change rather than think of $1 going to the Cuban government.